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WSV18-0198
SVA INTEGRATIVE MEDICINE & ACUPUNCTURE
A CASE STUDY ON SKIN ALLERGY
S.H. Oh1
1Animal Ark, TCM, Singapore, Singapore
CASE STUDY: APPLICATION OF ACUPUNCTURE FOR SKIN ALLERGIES
Introduction
Bao Bao, a Golden Retriever, was presented with serious pruritus and would constantly scratch at her burning sores and her scaly skin all over her body, even at night. As her allergies became worse, her skin also became more red and inflamed.
Objective
The objective was to stop skin allergies from becoming worse and to improve skin condition.
Methods
Bao Bao’s condition and symptoms were understood from a Traditional Chinese Medicine perspective and acupuncture was performed accordingly.
Results
Within 3 months of treatment, most of her skin has recovered and with only a few occasional hotspots.
Conclusion
The method “circle the dragon” can be effective in helping to quickly alleviate serious skin allergies.
Your Singapore, the Tropical Garden City
WSV18-0080
ENDOCRINOLOGY
ENDOCRINE CALCIUM DISORDERS
C. Ward1
1University of Georgia College of Veterinary Medicine, Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, Athens, USA
ENDOCRINOLOGY: GLUCOCORTICOID-DEFICIENT HYPOADRENOCORTICISM IN DOGS
Cynthia Ward, VMD, PhD, Dipl ACVIM
University of Georgia College of Veterinary Medicine Athens, GA USA
The adrenal cortex consists of distinct zones that secrete different hormones based upon enzymes available in that region. The zonae glomerulosa is responsible for the secretion of mineralocorticoids, and the zonae fasciculate and reticularis secrete glucocorticoids. The primary mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid secreted in the dog are aldosterone and cortisol, respectively. Aldosterone secretion is primarily stimulated by activation of the renin- angiotensin system and hyperkalemia with only a small role of ACTH during severe volume depletion. Cortisol secretion from the adrenal gland is primarily regulated by the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis with ACTH providing the primary control.
Primary hypoadrenocorticism results from destruction
of the adrenal cortex such that cortisol and aldosterone are not able to be synthesized or secreted. This results
in the classic presentation of hypoadrenocorticism, with the animal being severely volume depleted with an
array of electrolye abnormalities including hyperkalemia, hyponatremia, hypochloridemia, and hypercalcemia.
The hallmark of primary hypoadrenocorticism is the low sodium:potassium ratio (less than 25-27). The test used
to diagnose primary hypoadrenocorticism is an ACTH- stimulation test in which cortisol is measured pre- and post- synthetic ACTH (CortrosynR) administration.
Secondary hypoadrenocorticism or atypical hypoadrenocorticism disease or glucocorticoid-deficient hypoadrenocorticism results from a lack of ACTH. In humans mutations resulting in CRH and ACTH deficiencies have been reported; however, in dogs, secondary hypoadrencorticism is thought to result from a lack of ACTH due to pituitary failure. The failure of ACTH secretion has
its primary effect on the zonae fasiculata and reticularis
and thus spares the zona glomerulosa and aldosterone secretion. These dogs will maintain mineralocorticoid activity, but will be glucocorticoid deficient. In most dogs, the HPA axis is only evaluated by cortisol (glucocorticoid) measurement. The mineralocorticoid activity is estimated by evaluating Na and K concentrations. It has been shown that some dogs with normal serum Na and K concentrations
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