Page 164 - WSAVA2018
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 25-28 September, 2018 | Singapore
WSV18-0282
SVA INTEGRATIVE MEDICINE
OSTEOARTHRITIS: THINKING BEYOND NSAIDS - AN INTEGRATIVE APPROACH
R. Koh1
1Veterinary Teaching Hospital, Louisiana State University School of Veterinary Medicine, Baton Rouge, USA
2Veterinary Medical Center, University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine, Gainesville, USA
Introduction
Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disorder
in the animals and one of the most common sources of pain and disability in the elderly animals. Chronic wear and tear on the joints is the underlying mechanism for OA. It is inevitable that there will be some degenerative change in animals’ joints over their lifetime. The most common sites are the elbows, hips, spine, and any joint that has sustained traumatic injury. Joint pain is the principal symptom, but swelling, deformity, stiffness, and loss of function also occur. Chronic pain is undoubtedly the biggest threat to our pet’s quality of life as they age. Fortunately, it is also a great example of a health issue that will benefit markedly from integrative therapy.
The initial step when addressing the arthritic patient is a thorough assessment of range of motion (ROM), weight- bearing status, girth measurements, palpation, overall function and owner perception of problems with home activities. A pain scale may be used to determine the level of pain. Weight-bearing status may be determined through dynamic or static force-plates, or scales. The overall function and goals of the owner should be determined in the evaluation, and progress using the various assessment tools should be monitored. After the problem list and the goals have been determined, integrative therapies can be implemented as part of a multimodal treatment program for OA.
Multimodal Approach to Osteoarthritis
When managing pain in OA patients, a multimodal approach should be used as early as possible. This
can include the use of anti-inflammatories, opioids, tricyclic antidepressants, anticonvulsants, NMDA receptor antagonists, nutraceuticals, herbal therapies, acupuncture, laser, electromagnetic field, shockwave, therapeutic exercises, and adjunctive physical modalities. With this approach, both pharmacologic and non- pharmacologic therapies complement one another to increase the effectiveness of any given analgesic drug by intervening at multiple places along the nociceptive pathway. Utilizing a multimodal approach may also allow efficacious use at lower drug doses.
43RD WORLD SMALL ANIMAL VETERINARY ASSOCIATION CONGRESS AND 9TH FASAVA CONGRESS
 13-Mask induction can be performed however there is a major concern with environmental air pollution in the OR. Males don’t have to be oro-tracheal intubated if the surgeon is fast however females should always be intubated and ventilated. Remember, isoflurane, and other inhalants by it self are do not provide analgesia and should not be used by it self.
References are available upon request
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