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WSV18-0025
WSAVA VACCINATION GUIDELINES
DOG VACCINATION
M. Day1
1University of Bristol, Bristol Veterinary School, Langford, United Kingdom
WSAVA CANINE VACCINATION GUIDELINESEmeritus Professor Michael J. Day
BSc BVMS(Hons) PhD DSc DiplECVP FASM FRCPath FRCVS
Chairman, WSAVA Vaccination Guidelines Group profmjday@gmail.com
Global Canine Vaccination Guidelines
There are two sets of canine vaccination guidelines available: those produced by the American Animal Hospital Association [1] and those from the WSAVA VGG [2-4]. The fundamental principle of both sets of guidelines, as encapsulated by the VGG, is that ‘We should aim to vaccinate every animal with core vaccines. Non-core vaccines should be given no more frequently than is deemed necessary.’
The WSAVA guidelines suggest that we should
aim to vaccinate MORE animals. This relates to the phenomenon of ‘herd immunity’. Herd immunity suggests that, for some diseases, where a minimum proportion
(for example 75%) of a herd of animals is vaccinated, it
is difficult for an infectious disease outbreak to occur
in that herd. The ‘herd’ for the canine practitioner is the population of dogs living within his or her practice area – and our aim should be to have as many of these animals vaccinated as possible, in order to reduce the chances of disease outbreak in the herd. This is particularly important in the context of canine rabies. Where a mass vaccination campaign results in at least 70% of the dog population receiving vaccine, there is marked impact on the prevalence of canine and human rabies.
In order to apply the principles of vaccination guidelines, it is firstly necessary to understand the definitions of ‘core’ and ‘non-core’ vaccines. CORE vaccines are those that all animals should receive to protect them against potentially lethal diseases of global significance or where legislation may dictate [i.e. canine rabies]. The use of NON-CORE vaccines in certain animals is dictated by geographical location, lifestyle and exposure risk. Some vaccines are NOT RECOMMENDED because there is little scientific justification for their use.For dogs, the
core vaccines are those that protect against canine distemper virus (CDV), canine adenovirus (CAV) and canine parvovirus-2 (CPV). In any country in which rabies is an endemic disease, then rabies vaccination is also
43RD WORLD SMALL ANIMAL VETERINARY ASSOCIATION CONGRESS AND 9TH FASAVA CONGRESS
25-28 September, 2018 | Singapore
Conclusion
Collaborative intelligence is the measure of your ability to think with others on behalf of what matters to us all. To access that intelligence, we must learn to dignify differences in how we think and use them to face complex challenges.2 Expertise in one area is of little use if not open to collaborate with others to make the expertise valuable. Veterinary professionals are key actors in disaster management and are instrumental for crisis decision making through collaborative intelligence.
References
1 Hackman J.R, (2011), Collaborative intelligence using teams to solve hard problems, Berrett-Koehler Publishers Inc, San Francisco, USA
2 Markova, D., & McArthur A., (2015) Collaborative intelligence: thinking with people who think differently, Roundhouse Publishing Group,
3 Merchant., R, Benschop, J., & MacPherson N.,(2017), Lepto a changing scene; Disturbing public health data, Plus the findings from the FLAG Dairy study and Reports of lepto cases following floods, NZVA Dairy Cattle Vets Newsletter, Issue 35, Issue 1 (Sept 2017)4 New Zealand Red Cross (2015) Psychological First Aid Training, New Zealand Red Cross, Wellington, New Zealand
5. Pijnacker R., Goris MG, te Wierik MJ, Broens EM, van der Giessen JW, de Rosa M, Wagenaar JA , Hartskeerl RA, Notermans DW , Maassen K, Schimmer B,(2016) Marked increase in leptospirosis infections in humans and dogs in the Netherlands, 2014, Euro Surveill. 2016;21(17):pii=30211








































































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