Page 193 - WSAVA2018
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WSV18-0199
SVA INTEGRATIVE MEDICINE
APPLICATION OF BLADDER MERIDIAN IN CLINICAL CASES
S.H. Oh1
1Animal Ark, TCM, Singapore, Singapore
APPLICATION OF BLADDER MERIDIAN IN CLINICAL CASES
Introduction
The bladder meridian is the longest channel in the body.
Objective
The objective is to evaluate the feasibility of using acupuncture points along the bladder meridian to treat illnesses of internal organs, neck, back, lumbar and legs.
Methods
Acupuncture points were chosen based on the symptoms in each case and performed twice a week for two months.
Results/Conclusion
Most of the cases have shown that performing acupuncture along the bladder meridian points can be both safe and effective in treating physical and psychological illnesses.
Your Singapore, the Tropical Garden City
WSV18-0318
ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY (SIMULTANEOUS TRANSLATION INTO MANDARIN CHINESE)
TOP TIPS FOR TREATING LONG BONE FRACTURES IN GROWING ANIMALS: DECISION MAKING AND TREATMENT
A. Piras1
1Specialist in Veterinary Surgery, Ravenna, Italy
Top Tips for Treating Long Bones Fractures in Growing Animals: Decision Making and Treatment
Alessandro Piras
DVM - Specialist in Veterinary Surgery
Dogs reach skeletal maturity between 5 to 18 months depending on the breed. During this period, all bones exhibit a two-phase growth cycle, an initial rapid phase (20 wk) followed by a substantially slower growth to maturation (48 wk). During the initial part of this biphasic developmental process, both structural and material properties of the immature bone are very different from those of adult bone. Major characteristics are a lower strength and stiffness, lower yield stress and elastic modulus. If we also consider that the diaphyseal cortices in the young dogs are considerably thinner than in the adult, is intuitive that immature canine bone is potentially susceptible to implant failure due to screw pull out
Diaphyseal fractures in immature dogs are usually simple low energy fractures, often incomplete and can be associated with intact paired bones.
Greenstick fractures of the cortex are very common; they are incomplete fractures where only one side of the cortex is fractured while the opposite cortex is bent due to the elasticity and plasticity of the juvenile bone. The intact cortex is along the compression aspect of the fracture. The thick periosteum of immature animals can act as a restraint and stabilizer of the fracture preventing full displacement of the segments. The periosteum also aids in focal hematoma formation, subsequent callus formation and fracture healing. These fractures tend to heal very rapidly due to the their strong and very active periosteum.
Clinical examination
The puppy may be presented with a history of non- weight bearing or partial weight bearing lameness. The affected area can show various degrees of deformity, swelling and local pain. Palpable crepitius is usually absent. Careful physical and radiographic examination (Orthogonal X-ray views of the affected and controlateral limb) is necessary to complete the diagnosis.
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