Page 298 - WSAVA2018
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 25-28 September, 2018 | Singapore
WSV18-0086
SVA DERMATOLOGY (SIMULTANEOUS TRANSLATION INTO MANDARIN CHINESE)
IMMUNOTHERAPY: SUBCUTANEOUS VS. SUBLINGUAL
M. Siak1
Diagnostic work up
Signalment and history
Age
· Demodicosis and dermatophytosis typically affect young dogs
· Epitheliotrophic lymphoma most commonly in old dogs
Breed
· Sebaceous adenitis more common in Standard Poo- dles, Akita Inus, Vizslas and Hovawarts
· Dermatomyositis usually affects collies, Shetland Sheepdogs and crosses
History
· Concurrent muscle atrophy/weakness suggestive for dermatomyositis
Physical and dermatological examinations
· Comedones due to follicular plugging by demodex mites or sebaceous adenitis
· Follicular casts for sebaceous adenitis and demodex mites
· Excessive scaling suggestive for dermatophytes or sebaceous adenitis
· Papules, pustules and crusting for bacterial folliculitis Diagnostic tests
· Wood’s lamp to check for dermatophytes i.e. ap- ple-green fluorescence, and to select hair for KOH and fungal culture
· Skin scrapes: both deep and superficial for demodex mites
· Cytology for bacterial pyoderma and demodex mites
· Trichogram: Follicular casts for sebaceous adenitis, demodex mites around hair shafts, fungal hyphae/ arthrospores along and within hair shafts
· Tissue biopsies for histopathology is required diag- nose sebaceous adenitis, ischemic dermatopathy, alopecia areata and epitheliotropic lymphoma
Non-pruritic symmetrical non-inflammatory alopecia
  1Western Australian Veterinary Emergency and Special-
ty WAVES, Veterinary Dermatology, Western Australia, Australia
Introduction
Alopecia is the loss or absence of hair on the body where hair is normally present. Hair growth in the dog follows the hair cycle, namely anagen (growing phase), catagen (intermediate phase) and telogen (resting phase). Hair is shed in the telogen phase as a new hair begins at the anagen phase.
Alopecia
The first step in determining the underlying cause(s)
of alopecia is to make sure that the alopecia is not congenital i.e. from birth. This is characteristic for certain breeds such as Mexican Hairless Dog, Chinese Crested Dog and Peruvian Hairless Dog. It can also be abnormal in dogs affected by ectodermal dysplasia (has concurrent teeth abnormalities).
The next step is to differentiate if alopecia is due to self-trauma or spontaneous. Self-traumatic alopecia is usually due to pruritic causes e.g. allergies and will not be covered in this presentation. If you are unsure, a trichogram can assist in this differentiation i.e. broken hair tips suggestive of self-traumatic alopecia vs smooth tapered hair tips for non-pruritic alopecia.
Non-pruritic alopecia can be broadly divided into inflammatory vs non-inflammatory and symmetric vs non- symmetric alopecia. Inflammatory causes usually result in non-symmetric (focal to multifocal) alopecia. Conversely, non-inflammatory causes usually result in symmetric or diffuse alopecia.
Non-pruritic non-symmetrical inflammatory alopecia
 Differential diagnoses
  Hormonal disorders
 Hypothyroidism
 Hyperadrenocorticism (spontaneous vs iatrogenic)
  Sex hormone imbalances: (endogenous and exogenous)
  Hair cycle disorders
  Hair cycle arrest aka “Alopecia X”
 Recurrent cyclic flank alopecia
 Pattern baldness
 Anagen/Telogen effluvium
   Follicular dysplasia
 Colour dilution alopecia
 Black hair follicular dysplasia
 Differential diagnoses
      Common causes
  · Demodicosis
· Dermatophytosis
· Bacterial folliculitis (usually pruritic but can be subtle)
   Less common causes
 · Sebaceous adenitis
· Ischemic dermatopathies e.g. dermatomyositis
· Alopecia areata
· Epitheliotropic lymphoma
    296
Various hormones affect the hair cycle by stimulating
43RD WORLD SMALL ANIMAL VETERINARY ASSOCIATION CONGRESS AND 9TH FASAVA CONGRESS





































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