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with some success, including laser and cryosurgery. Finally, radiation treatment has been used effectively in some cases.
PERIODONTAL DISEASE
Periodontal disease is a very common problem in veterinary patients. It has numerous severe local and systemic ramifications, however outward clinical signs occur only very late in the disease course. This means that it is significantly underdiagnosed, and even when recognized and treatment recommended, clients are reluctant to comply as they do not perceive the problem. Regardless, proper and prompt therapy of periodontal disease is beneficial for the health of the patient as well as financially for the practice.
Juvenile gingivitis occurs in young cats around the
time of permanent teeth eruption and is associated with marginal and free gingiva inflammation circumferentially. This is inflammation of the gingiva during and just after tooth eruption and may be accompanied by persistent deciduous dentition. FOT The gingival bleeding
index is II or III so bleeding may occur on probing or spontaneously. Thick plaque deposition is present but gingival probing depth non necessarily exceeds 1mm. This is self limiting in most cases, however home care (brushing or chlorhexidine rinses are recommended to decrease the inflammation. If the condition does not resolve in a short period of time, additional diagnostics and therapy is recommended as this could tend to switch into juvenile periodontitis.
FELINE OROFACIAL PAIN SYNDROME (FOPS)
Feline orofacial pain syndrome (FOPS) is a pain disorder of cats with behavioural signs of oral discomfort
and tongue mutilation. FOPS is suspected to be a neuropathic pain disorder and the predominance within the Burmese cat breed suggests an inherited disorder, possibly involving central and/or ganglion processing
of sensory trigeminal information. The disease is characterised by an episodic, typically unilateral, discomfort with pain-free intervals. The discomfort is triggered, in many cases, by mouth movements. The disease is often recurrent and with time may become unremitting - 12% of cases in this series were euthanased as a consequence of the condition.
WSV18-0053
NAVC SHORT TOPICS FROM EXPERTS
HOW I TREAT POST-OP FHO WITH PHYSICAL REHABILITATION
J. Van Dyke1
1CRI, Faculty, Wellington, USA
NAVC SHORT TOPICS FROM EXPERTS: HOW I TREAT POST-OP FHO
WITH PHYSICAL REHABILITATION Janet B. Van Dyke, DVM,
Diplomate American College of Veterinary Sports Medicine and Rehabilitation
Wellington, Florida USA janetvandyke@me.com
Canine rehabilitation is the application of physiotherapeutic techniques to evaluate and treat musculoskeletal impairments in our canine patients. It incorporates the use of objective outcome measures (goniometers, girthometers, etc.), manual assessments (including palpation, joint glides, and neurological assessment), gait analysis, and special tests brought from the field of human physiotherapy. This allows the therapist to tease out the specific structure and tissue type causing the impairments.The therapist evaluates the presenting complaint, subjective information from the owner, and objective assessment carried out during the examination to create a problem list. Each item
on the problem list is addressed in the plan of care. Therapeutic plans generally involve a combination of manual therapies (joint mobilizations and soft tissue mobilizations), physical modalities (laser, therapeutic ultrasound, e-stim, shockwave), and therapeutic exercises. The modalities are generally used to prepare the tissues for the manual therapies and therapeutic exercises. Physical modalities should never be the sole therapeutic method applied to any patient.Therapeutic exercise plans are based upon the weight bearing status of the patient, with early interventions focusing upon functional weight bearing exercises, later progressing
to functional strengthening exercises. All exercise
plans incorporate proprioception, balance, strength, flexibility, and endurance. Exercise equipment includes physioballs (shaped as rolls, peanuts, eggs, donuts
and balls), cavaletti poles, therapy band, rocker/wobble boards, and treadmills.Physical modality parameters are chosen based upon the acuity of the injury. They are used to prepare the tissues for additional therapy and can generally be applied by trained veterinary nurses. The most commonly used physical modalities include neuromuscular electrical stimulation, laser, therapeutic ultrasound, extracorporeal shock wave therapy, and
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