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WSV18-0164
ANIMAL WELLNESS & WELFARE
THE ROLE OF VETERINARY NURSES IN OPTIMIZING ANIMAL WELFARE
J. Davies1, Walters H.1, H. Bacon1, C. Dwyer1
1Jeanne Marchig International Centre for Animal Welfare Edu- cation, Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies and the Ros- lin Institute, University of Edinburgh, Easter Bush Campus Roslin
Many countries around the world currently have no veterinary nursing profession and challenges to animal welfare are common. This presentation will introduce the role of the professional veterinary nurse and discuss the role of veterinary nurses in supporting veterinary clinical excellence and improving animal welfare.
Professional veterinary nurses are instrumental in performing a multitude of tasks; freeing up time for the vets to focus on their areas of interest and improving patient welfare through supporting good standards of clinical practice and low-stress handling. The distinct role of veterinary nurses will be outlined and their role in supporting good animal welfare and veterinary clinical excellence will be discussed.
Your Singapore, the Tropical Garden City
WSV18-0030
NUTRITION AND DIAGNOSTIC IMAGING (LECTURES GIVEN IN MANDARIN CHINESE)
TIPS FOR NUTRITION ASSESSMENT IN CATS
P.C. Teng1
1NATIONAL VETERINARY HOSPITAL, CAT ONLY CLINIC, TAICHUNG, Taiwan R.O.C.
TIPS FOR NUTRITION ASSESSMENT IN CATS Ping-Chih Teng, DVM
National Veterinary Hospital, Taichung, TAIWAN, R.O.C Sacropenia in geriatric cats:
The age related loss of muscle mass and strength is
a multi-factorial condition that occurs in old cats. In veterinary medicine, skeletal muscle atrophy is often observed in cats as they reach old age, but the process is not well understood. Weight loss and muscle wasting are very common and important for their health in senior cats. There are a lot of factors to be considered in assessing the nutritional needs of senior cats to ensure their health condition. Cats spend most of their time sleeping and grooming.
Therefore a 5-year-old cat may not move much more than a 5-year-old cat. Elderly cats also require more dietary energy because their fat and protein digestion
is impaired. Approximately 30% of cats older than 12 years of ages have decreased fat absorption, and 20% have decreased protein digestibility. Protein should not be restricted in elderly cats that do not have underlying renal diseases. Therefore senior diets may not be appropriate for all geriatric patients, and the veterinarian should assess body condition and overall health status before making a dietary recommendation. A Basic Nutritional Assessment should be performed when
a vet group is initially evaluating a cat. The first step when developing a nutritional plan for complete history, physical examination, and laboratory test should be performed to rule out diseases responsive to specific nutritional modifications. A key component of physical examination should be assessment of body condition.
The Global Nutrition Committee (GNC) developed global nutrition guidelines, which were first published in 2011. The goal of these guidelines is to help the veterinary healthcare team and pet owners ensure that dogs and cats are on an optimal nutrition plan tailored to the needs of the individual dog or cat.
In 2012, the GNC launched a Global Nutrition Toolkit, containing a suite of resources to assist practitioners
and nutritionists to educate pet owners that each pet should receive an individual nutritional assessment and recommendation. They are also published and translated into many languages. In Asia region, Chinese and
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