Page 430 - WSAVA2018
P. 430

 25-28 September, 2018 | Singapore
WSV18-0301
ANIMAL WELLNESS & WELFARE
JUST BECAUSE WE CAN, SHOULD WE?
K. Seksel1
1SABS, Registered Specialist in behavioural Medicine, Seaforth, Australia
Pets may exhibit behaviours that owners find unacceptable or distressing. Therefore many ways
of managing pets and their behaviour have been recommended. From this many training techniques and devices have been developed but not all of them are humane. They often promise “quick fix” solutions and thus appear attractive to owners. Unfortunately the “normal” pet may respond differently from the pet with mental health issues. The focus should always be on the effect it has on the pet and its short and long term welfare.
WSV18-0031
NUTRITION AND DIAGNOSTIC IMAGING (LECTURES GIVEN IN MANDARIN CHINESE)
THE ROLE OF NUTRITION IN THE MANAGEMENT OF FELINE DISEASES
P.C. Teng1
1NATIONAL VETERINARY HOSPITAL, CAT ONLY CLINIC, TAICHUNG, Taiwan R.O.C.
THE ROLE OF NUTRITION IN THE MANAGEMENT OF FELINE DISEASES
Ping-Chih Teng, DVM
National Veterinary Hospital, Taichung, TAIWAN,R.O.C
Nutritional treatment in critical care patients is
an important factor of the complete treatment
plan. Assessment of nutritional status and careful consideration of the disease course will help the selection of the most appropriate feeding method. Enteral nutrition is better than parenteral nutrition
when the gastrointestinal tract is functional. Common routes of enteral feeding include nasoesophageal, esophagostomy, gastrostomy, and jejunostomy feeding tubes. Parenteral nutrition is indicated for patients
who cannot tolerate enteral feedings, or are high risky anesthetic candidates for feeding tube placement.
An anorexia 4 kg pacreatitis patient is admitted for assisted nutrition support by feeding tube. This cat’s Resting Energy Requirement is: RER=30×4+70=190 calories per day. Using a standard illness factor of 1.2, this cat requires 228 calories per day. The maximum meals size is 45 ml/kg (stomach capacity of the cat). The cat is fed one third of the RER (76 calories) on day 1, two thirds of the RER (152 calories) on day 2, and all of the RER
after day 3. The risk of re-feeding syndrome supports the practice of slow initiation of full nutritional support, monitoring of electrolytes and glucose, phosphorous, anemic and addition of vitamins (especially thiamine) the nutritional formula.
Appetite stimulating medications will need to be considered in each case to ensure rational use of these agents. Appetite stimulation drug should never replace monitoring and ensuring adequate caloric intake, and may not be appropriate in some cases, such as critically
43RD WORLD SMALL ANIMAL VETERINARY ASSOCIATION CONGRESS AND 9TH FASAVA CONGRESS
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