Page 46 - WSAVA2018
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 25-28 September, 2018 | Singapore
Commonly Used Medications in Ornamental Fish
Amikacin – 5 mg/kg IM, IP every 3 days
Aztreonam (Azactam) – 100 mg/kg IM, IP every 2-5 days
Butorphanol – 0.1 mg/kg IM for pain control post- surgically
Dexamethasone – 1-2 mg/kg IM, IP q12h
Diflubenzuron (Dimilin) – 0.06 mg/L once weekly for 3 doses
Enrofloxacin (Baytril) – 10-14 mg/kg IM, IP q48h, or PO q24h
Epinephrine (1:1000) – 0.2-0.5 ml IM, IP, IC
Fenbendazole (Panacur) – 50 mg/kg orally for 2 days, 2 mg/L water q7d x 3 doses
Formalin (37% formaldehyde) – 25 mg/L (1 ml/10 gal) in pond every other day
Florfenicol (NuFlor) – 30-50 mg/kg IM, IP, PO q24-72h
Furosemide – 2-3 mg/kg IM, IP q12-72h
Gentamicin – 3 mg/kg IM once only due to kidney toxicity
Hydrogen peroxide – 250-500 mg/L dip to prevent fungal growth on eggs
Levamisole – 10 mg/L for 12-24h bath; 50 mg/L for a 2h bath
Metronidazole – 50 mg/L bath, daily for 3-10 days, 10 mg/g of food daily for 5 days
Oxytetracycline – 50-75 mg/kg BW, added to food daily for 10 days
Praziquantel (Droncit) – 5-25 mg/kg IM, IP, PO, 10 mg/L for 6-24h bath
Sulfadimethoxine-ormetoprim (Romet, Primor) – 50 mg/ kg IM or added to food
WSV18-0145
DIAGNOSTIC IMAGING
INTESTINAL OBSTRUCTION IN DOGS: GET THE MOST FROM ABDOMINAL RADIOGRAPHS
L. Gaschen1
1Louisiana State University, Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Baton Rouge, USA
Intestinal obstruction in Dogs: get the most from abdominal radiographs
Lorrie Gaschen, PhD, DVM, Dr.med.vet, DECVDI
Louisiana State University, School of Veterinary Medicine, Baton Rouge, LA USA
Introduction
Radiography allows an overview of the abdomen while ultrasonography does not. A short cut to ultrasound
in a vomiting animal could lead to misdiagnosis of a disease that could be readily identified radiographically. Therefore, radiography and ultrasonography should
be considered complimentary diagnostic tests. Barium studies still have importance in assessing animals with chronic gastrointestinal obstructions.
Take home message of this lecture:
1. A three view radiographic procedure is required in every vomiting dog or cat
a. Right and left lateral and a VD image
b. Left lateral places gas in the pylorus and duodenum to find foreign material
2. Wooden spoon compression
a. Compress the bowel with a wooden spoon to separate loops of jejunum from one another so that foreign material, linear foreign bodies and corruguations can be detected without superimposition
3. Barium studies and ultrasound should only be performed after 1 and 2 are performed
Ileus
Ileus is a failure of intestinal contents to be transported and is recognized radiographically by the presence of dilated bowel segments. Survey abdominal radiographs should always be performed in vomiting animals with vomiting. Ultrasound alone in such instances does not allow a global view of the abdomen, is much more time- consuming and non-gastrointestinal causes of the dog’s clinical signs as well as any secondary abnormalities may be overlooked. The radiographic appearance of ileus is dependent on its duration, location and degree of obstruction. Acute or very proximal obstructions may
43RD WORLD SMALL ANIMAL VETERINARY ASSOCIATION CONGRESS AND 9TH FASAVA CONGRESS
  Tetracycline – 250 mg/100 g of food Trimethoprim sulfa – 30 mg/kg IM, IP, PO q24-48h
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