Page 483 - WSAVA2018
P. 483

WSV18-0097
SVA PRACTICE MANAGEMENT
CHOOSING THE RIGHT ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE FOR YOUR CLINIC
M. Moran1
1Vets in Business Limited, The Head Honcho, Bridgwater, United Kingdom
CHOOSING THE RIGHT ORGANISATIONAL STRUCTURE FOR YOUR CLINIC
Mark Moran, BSc. MBA
Vets in Business Limited
Ashcott, TA7 9QS
Somerset, United Kingdom
mark@vetsinbusiness.co.uk
I am often asked “What is the best organisational structure for a practice”
In applying these roles to our practice we can differentiate between;
Those tasks that are concerned with the need to drive income and growth
AND
Those that are concerned with ensuring we consistently achieve the desired quality of output at the lowest total cost to the organisation
Income driving roles should reflect the income streams of the practice,
For example – Large animal, small animal, equine
Or - Main site, branch 1, branch 2
Or - 1st opinion work, referral work, out of hours
Whereas consistency and cost roles will apply to the deployment of resources or skills
For example – Vets, Nurses, Reception, HR, Finance, Health and Safety, etc.
For most practices non of these roles are likely to be full time, and so individuals can hold many roles
Owners must decide which roles they wish to keep, and those that they wish to pay someone else to do for them
However, owners need to remember that all of the roles will always be required and cannot be ignored, so if they choose to keep one, they must make the time to perform it!
The result of their choice will determine the appropriate structure for their practice
Owner centric
The most common form of structure for small practices is the owners centric or “hub and spoke” organisation
Positives
Your Singapore, the Tropical Garden City
   My answer is always, “well that depends!” What this talk is about is just what it depends upon.
Built on my experiences of helping practices with organisational change this talk hopes to;
· Review the most common organisational forms we find in practices today
· Review the strengths and weaknesses of each form
· Highlight the common issues that I find
· Identify the corrective actions required
In managing our practice (just like any other business)
there are three principal roles;
Strategy formulation, usually performed by “Directors” whose role is to set out the goals, strategies and policies of the practice
Management control, usually performed by managers whose role is to develop and manage the business processes that will deliver the strategies, policies and goals of the practice
Task control, usually performed by suitably skilled technicians, whose role is to ensure individual tasks are performed efficiently and effectivly
All of us will spend some of our time in all of these roles
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