Page 492 - WSAVA2018
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 25-28 September, 2018 | Singapore
WSV18-0313
AQUATIC PET MEDICINE AND WORLD RABIES DAY
INTERNATIONAL EFFORTS TO VALIDATE DAY-1 COMPETENCY IN AQUATIC VETERINARY EDUCATION
A.D. Scarfe1, T. Miller-Morgan2, D. Palić3, H.K.H Wong4, G.D. Taylor5, A. Reed6, S. St. Hilaire7
1Department of Paraclinical Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Pretoria, South Africa
1Aquatic Veterinary Associates International, LLC. 365 Monarch Birch Ct. Bartlett, IL, USA.
2Aquatic Animal Health Program, Oregon Sea Grant, College of Veterinary Medicine, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, USA.
3Department of Fish Diseases & Fisheries Biology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ludwig-Maximilians University, Munich, Germany
4School of Veterinary Medicine, City University of Hong Kong, China
5Department of Paraclinical Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Pretoria, South Africa
6Reed Aquatic Veterinary Services, Portland, OR, USA.
7School of Veterinary Medicine, City University of Hong Kong, China
The global demand for well-trained aquatic veterinarians represents a huge opportunity for veterinarians willing to expand the services they offer clients. While aquatic animals (fish, amphibians, reptiles, non-agricultural birds and mammals, etc.) are frequently considered exotic or minor species, aquatic veterinary medicine is a well- defined, but poorly recognized veterinary discipline. As the fastest growing veterinary disciple globally, services to aquatic pet (ornamental) and aquaculture (farmed fisheries) represents a largely untapped opportunity for many veterinarians wanting to expand their practices.
By example, globally captured and farmed seafood production is now larger than any other animal protein- producing industry (Figure 1) an industry considered
by many to be one of the few industries that will feed an ever-growing human population that is expected to reach 9-10 billion by 2050. (Table 1).
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Figure 1.:Current production global animal protein producing industries. Data from FAO (2018) and FishStatJ database (accessible at: http://www.fao.org/fishery/statistics/en).
Similarly, in many countries the number of ornamental (pet) aquatic animal is growing, and frequently exceeds the number of cats or dog owned (AVMA 2012; APPA, 2017; Statista, 2017). But more importantly, by example,
in the USA, while 30-35% of households in the U.S. have dogs (60 million) and/or cats (47 million), more than 15 million households (12%) own pet fish almost as many that own all other types of minor species pets, collectively (Figure 2).
Unfortunately, increasing impacts of diseases have had enormous impacts on these industries.
Numerous efforts are underway ensure that sufficient numbers of veterinarians are available to support aquaculture industries and producers, government agencies that support or regulate aquaculture, and
a myriad of other supporting industries that provide therapeutic products, laboratory diagnostic services, and a number of other services. However, little attention has been given to ensure that veterinary school curricular provide the core (Day-1) knowledge, skills and experience (KSEs) or competency, to service the needs of ornamental (pet) owing, or aquaculture (seafood producing) clients. Without this infrastructure, sustainable and economically viable aquaculture will simply not thrive.
There is therefore a critical need for a well-trained aquatic veterinary workforce1.
The work presented here therefore outlines the
43RD WORLD SMALL ANIMAL VETERINARY ASSOCIATION CONGRESS AND 9TH FASAVA CONGRESS









































































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