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 25-28 September, 2018 | Singapore
placebo at 6 weeks.
Ruff, Kevin & Kopp, Kenneth & Von Behrens, Pamela & Lux, Mark & Mahn, Matthew & Back, Matthew. (2016). Effectiveness of NEM® brand eggshell membrane in the treatment of suboptimal joint function in dogs:
a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo- controlled study. Veterinary Medicine: Research and Reports. Volume 7. 113-121.
Vitamin D3
Vitamin D3 is important for supporting healthy bone structure. Unlike humans, VitD3 in dogs is primarily absorbed from dietary sources with negligible absorption from the sun. After oral ingestion, VitD3 is converted
in the liver to 25- hydroxyvitamin D and then further hydroxylated in the kidney to its biologically active form 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D (or calcitriol). In recent studies, a multitude of chronic illnesses have been associated with VitD3 deficiencies in people.
In addition, an observational study in people showed that participants with low intake of dietary vitamin D and lower serum levels of vitamin D were approximately 3 times more likely to exhibit progression of established knee osteoarthritis than those with higher levels. Another study noted that vitamin D may be related to the processes that impede or give rise to locomotor conditions and could play a major role in modulating oxidative stress, participating in immune responses, and contributing to cell differentiation.
Summary
There is a strong and compelling body of evidence supporting the role of nutraceuticals in joint health in veterinary practice. The final question is “how confident are you that the product you are recommending contains what the label says that it does?” A study of randomly selected nutraceuticals showed that 84% of the products tested did not meet their label claims with contents ranging as low as 0% of the claimed content in some products. Contamination with unwanted ingredients
is also a problem within this relatively unregulated industry. For a small fee, Consumer Labs (consumerlab. com) provides independent laboratory testing of various products contents and purity.
The use of joint nutraceuticals in dogs prior to the development of OA is controversial. No controlled studies have been reported that document the efficacy of nutraceuticals in preventing the development of OA. However, because of their reported effects on improving cartilage matrix and reducing levels of inflammatory mediators within the joint, many clinicians have advocated the prophylactic use of joint nutraceuticals, particularly in athletic dogs that might be susceptible to joint injury. Additional research is needed to confirm the value of prophylactic use of joint nutraceuticals.
SUMMARY:
Joint nutraceuticals have been shown, through in vitro studies and controlled clinical trials, to be useful in the treatment of OA. They can be used for long-term management of patients with all stages of OA and carry minimal risk. The use of joint nutraceuticals can significantly reduce the need for NSAIDS and other medications in patients with OA.
Amongst all the appealing supplements that are purported to have a ‘protective’ effect on the development of OA, nothing has been proven to
have the degree of protection as calorie restriction has. Although glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate have been found to have a mild analgesic effect in moderate-to-severe pain patients,10,11 the same study found no significant effect of these supplements on disease progression over a 2-year period,12 whereas other studies have found a small beneficial effect of glucosamine sulfate on disease progression.13 Indeed, there seems to be some evidence of a small structure modifying effect of glucosamine sulfate (particularly in the mild OA cases) in a few human clinical studies.14,15
10. CLEGG DO, REDA DJ, HARRIS CL, KLEIN MA, O’DELL JR, HOOPER MM, ET AL. GLUCOSAMINE, CHONDROITIN SULFATE, AND THE TWO IN COMBINATION FOR PAINFUL KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS. N ENGL J MED. 2006; 354(8): 795–808.
11. HOCHBERG MC, CLEGG DO. POTENTIAL EFFECTS OF CHONDROITIN SULFATE ON JOINT SWELLING: A GAIT REPORT. OSTEOARTHRITIS CARTILAGE. 2008; 16 SUPPL 3: S22–4.
12. SAWITZKE AD, SHI H, FINCO MF, DUNLOP DD, BINGHAM CO, 3RD, HARRIS CL, ET AL. THE EFFECT OF GLUCOSAMINE AND/OR CHONDROITIN SULFATE ON THE PROGRESSION OF KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS: A REPORT FROM THE GLUCOSAMINE/CHONDROITIN ARTHRITIS INTERVENTION TRIAL. ARTHRITIS RHEUM. 2008; 58(10): 3183–91.
13. BRUYERE O, HONORE A, ETHGEN O,
ROVATI LC, GIACOVELLI G, HENROTIN YE, ET
AL. CORRELATION BETWEEN RADIOGRAPHIC SEVERITY OF KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS AND FUTURE DISEASE PROGRESSION. RESULTS FROM A 3-YEAR PROSPECTIVE, PLACEBO-CONTROLLED STUDY EVALUATING THE EFFECT OF GLUCOSAMINE SULFATE. OSTEOARTHRITIS CARTILAGE. 2003; 11(1): 1–5.
14. REGINSTER JY, NEUPREZ A, LECART MP, SARLET N, BRUYERE O. ROLE OF GLUCOSAMINE IN THE TREATMENT FOR OSTEOARTHRITIS. RHEUMATOL INT. 2012.
15. RICHY F, BRUYERE O, ETHGEN O, CUCHERAT
M, HENROTIN Y, REGINSTER JY. STRUCTURAL
AND SYMPTOMATIC EFFICACY OF GLUCOSAMINE AND CHONDROITIN IN KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS: A COMPREHENSIVE META-ANALYSIS. ARCH INTERN MED. 2003; 163(13): 1514–22.
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43RD WORLD SMALL ANIMAL VETERINARY ASSOCIATION CONGRESS AND 9TH FASAVA CONGRESS







































































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