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 25-28 September, 2018 | Singapore
Elsevier Saunders 2014: 189-193
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al. Diabetes mellitus in a population
of 180,000 insured dogs: Incidence, survival and breed distribution. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine 2007; 21:11209-1216
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WSV18-0201
AQUATIC PET MEDICINE AND WORLD RABIES DAY
RABIES VACCINATION BACKGROUNDS AND FACTORS AFFECTING RABIES CONTROL IN AN ENDEMIC AREA FOLLOWED BY BOEHRINGER INGELHEIM/WSAVA WORLD RABIES DAY PANEL DISCUSSION
S. Suradhat1
1Faculty of Veterinary Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330, Thailand
Introduction
Rabies is one of the deadliest zoonoses, caused by the virus of the Lyssavirus genus (family Rhabdoviridae). Spreading in almost every continents of the world, with more than 150 endemic countries, rabies claims nearly 60,000 human lives annually and it is estimated that every 10 minutes, a person dies from rabies infection. Most of the human rabies victims were children, <15 years of age, in the Africa and Asia. Every year, more than 15 million people worldwide receive a post-bite vaccination. Recent increases in human rabies deaths
in parts of Africa and Asia suggest that rabies is re- emerging as a serious public health issue. More than 95% of human rabies deaths resulted from exposure to infected dogs (http://www.oie.int/). Despite the almost 100% mortality, rabies is a vaccine preventable diseases. Effective vaccines, available commercially for both humans and dogs, can be used for both pre- and post- exposure prophylaxis.
Immunology of rabies vaccination
Currently available rabies vaccines can protect against all strains of the rabies viruses and provide good cross- protective immunity against the viruses in phylogroup
I, but not II and III, of the Lyssavirus. Currently, there
are inactivated vaccine, recombinant canarypox virus expressing the rabies glycoprotein available for the use in domestic animals. In addition, live vaccinia vector expressing the rabies glycoprotein (oral vaccine) is
also available for certain wildlife species including raccoon and coyotes. The goal of rabies vaccination
is to induce viral neutralizing antibodies (VNA) against the glycoprotein before the virus gain access to the host nervous system. Although a level of protective VNA cannot be truly established, a minimum level of 0.5 IU/ml is used as a correlate of protection. In general, protective immunity should be achieved by day 14 of
a post-exposure immunization regimen, regardless of concurrent administration of rabies immunoglobulin (RIG) and irrespective of age. In vaccinated animals,
an antibody titer gradually increases and peaks approximately at 28 days following initial vaccination. Unlike other vaccines, anti-rabies VNA rapidly declined within 60 days and vaccinated animals turned
43RD WORLD SMALL ANIMAL VETERINARY ASSOCIATION CONGRESS AND 9TH FASAVA CONGRESS
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16. Bigliardi E, Bresciani C, Callegari D et al. Use of aglepristone in the treatment of Progesterone induced insulin resistance in dogs. Journal of Veterinary Science, 2013; December 27. (Epub ahead of print) http://pdf.medrang.co.kr/JVS/000/ JVS-ahead-131227171520.pdf (accessed April 24, 2018)
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