Page 588 - WSAVA2018
P. 588

 25-28 September, 2018 | Singapore
to 90%.
Once fluid has been obtained, a smear should be stained and evaluated microscopically. Depending upon the cell types seen, a determination of the presence of leakage can be made.
Below are examples of expected cytology in patients with and without leak.
1) Healthy PMNs with few degenerate PMNs and a moderate number of red blood cells: This cytology may be expected in any postoperative abdominal procedure (e.g., OHE, abdominal exploratory, cystotomy). Your index of suspicion for anastomotic breakdown should be low. However, if clinical signs continue to deteriorate, repeat paracentesis (2 - 3 times daily, if necessary) to determine the “trend” of the abdominal fluid cytology is recommended.
2) Healthy polymorphonuclear leukocytes with bacteria located intra or extracellularly, degenerate PMNs with intracellular bacteria, free bacteria, or food particles imply breakdown. Exploratory laparotomy is indicated.
In a recent morbidity/mortality study of patients undergoing intestinal surgery it was found that animals requiring a second abdominal surgery to treat intestinal disorders were less likely to survive than patients requiring only one laparotomy. Also, the longer it took to determine whether or not intestinal leakage had occured the less likely the patient would survive reoperation. The take home message is: pay attention to detail during the first surgery and if a leak occurs, diagnose it and treat it as soon as possible.
Prognosis The overall prognosis for uncomplicated GI surgery is excellent. The surgeon must pay attention to detail when suturing any hollow viscus organ with liquid contents.
WSV18-0055
WSAVA GLOBAL NUTRITION
EVERYBODY EATS: DON’T FORGET TO FEED YOUR HOSPITALIZED PATIENTS
M. de Scally1, L. Weeth2
1Hilton Veterinary Hospital, Internal Medicine, Hilton, South Africa
2Weeth Nutrition Services, Clinical Nutrition, Los Angeles, USA
The basics of critical care nutrition include an initial patient assessment, the prescribing an appropriate
diet whilst being mind-full of the diagnosis and disease severity, deciding on a method of delivery of that diet, setting goals for the nutritional intervention, and finally assessing whether these goals are in fact being met. The goals of critical care nutrition are to meet resting energy requirements as well as to supply sufficient essential and conditionally essential amino acids and all other micro and macro nutrient needs of that patient. A plethora of methods are available to us to achieve this, including
a variety of diet and feeding tube options for the still preferred enteral nutrition route as well as multiple solution options and peripheral and central line options for parental nutrition. In some cases, partial parenteral and enteral nutrition best supplies the patient’s nutritional needs.
    586
43RD WORLD SMALL ANIMAL VETERINARY ASSOCIATION CONGRESS AND 9TH FASAVA CONGRESS
















































































   586   587   588   589   590