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WSV18-0226
CLINICAL PATHOLOGY
CASE STUDIES IN CYTOLOGY
M. Bera1
1Asia Veterinary Diagnostics, Diagnostic Division, Singapore, Singapore
CLINICAL PATHOLOGY: CASE STUDIES IN CYTOLOGY Dr Monali M Bera, DVM, MS, DACVP
Asia Veterinary Diagnostics
466 Serangoon Road, Singapore 218225 drmonalibera@vetdiagnosticcentre.com.hk
Can you identify those common tumors in the skin and subcutis? Do you feel a little overwhelmed when trying
to differentiate inflammation from certain tumors? And what makes mesothelial cells so confusing? Whether it comes to FNAs of common skin lumps and bumps and/or cells in body fluids, this seminar will focus on a series of case studies which will go through several common and some unique cases you may or may have not seen in your clinic. By the end of this seminar, you should leave feeling more comfortable differentiating inflammation from neoplasia and interpreting cells in body fluids (cavitary effusions, nasal, bladder, and prostatic washes), including those mysterious mesothelial cells.
Your Singapore, the Tropical Garden City
WSV18-0172
ISFM - FELINE CARDIOLOGY
WHICH CATS WITH ARTERIAL THROMBOEMBOLISM IS IT ETHICAL TO TREAT?
K. Borgeat1
1Langford Vets- University of Bristol, Cardiology, Bristol, United Kingdom
Arterial thromboembolism: what we know
Arterial thromboembolism (ATE) is a condition associated with high morbidity and mortality in cats, most commonly with an acute and distressing presentation. For clinical purposes, it is often defined as thromboembolism to
≥1 limb. In most cases, the thrombus originates in the
left side of the heart; feline ATE is most commonly associated with cardiomyopathy, although cardiac disease is not present in all affected cats. Although pulmonary thromboembolism also involves arterial occlusion, it usually is classified as a separate syndrome. Presenting signs of limb ATE are easily recognized.
Loss of peripheral pulses, tissue pallor, lower motor neuron signs and cool extremities in the presence of neuromuscular pain provide a highly suggestive clinical picture. Smith et al reported that 1/175 (0.6%) of their hospital feline population presented with ATE, a similar prevalence to 1/142 cats (0.7%) reported by Buchanan et al from a different centre, almost 40 years earlier. These data were obtained from cats treated in referral practice and do not necessarily represent the general feline population. Borgeat et al (2014) published findings in 250 cats with ATE in general practice, and prevalence was 0.26% - less than half that reported from referral centres.
It is widely acknowledged that ATE has a poor prognosis, although no prospective studies have reported the outcome of cats presenting with a first episode of
acute clinical signs. Several retrospective studies suggest that euthanasia at presentation is common
and <50% patients survive to discharge. Smith et al reported that hypothermia, ≥2 affected limbs, absence of motor function, hyperphosphataemia and bradycardia were associated with a decreased rate of survival to discharge. Moore et al also reported that hypothermia and ≥2 affected limbs were associated with death or euthanasia before discharge. It has been suggested that cats in congestive heart failure (CHF) have a shorter survival time after discharge (Smith et al, 2003). Among cats discharged from the clinic, recurrence of ATE is common.
In first opinion clinics, rectal temperature is also vital to assess at presentation: lower rectal temperature was crucial in predicting death at 24h and before 7 days of an ATE episode (Borgeat et al, 2014). Interestingly, this retrospective study also reported that treatment with an anti-platelet agent (aspirin, clopidogrel, or both drugs)
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