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WSVA8-0013
ANIMAL WELFARE
PREVALENCE OF HEALTH PROBLEMS IN SHELTER DOGS IN THE CZECH REPUBLIC
V. Vecerek1, S. Vitulova1, E. Voslarova1, M. Volfova1
1University of Veterinary and Pharmaceutical Sciences Brno, Department of Animal Protection Welfare and Behaviour, Brno, Czech Republic
INTRODUCTION
Health and injury status are considered major determinants of adoption in dogs. They influence the likelihood of adoption as well as the length of stay at the shelter.
OBJECTIVES
The aim of this study was to analyze a prevalence of health problems in shelter dogs.
METHODS
The subject of this retrospective study were dogs impounded at a Czech municipal shelter over a ten- year period (2007 to 2016). The results were analyzed using the statistical package Unistat 5.6. Statistical comparisons between frequencies of the categorical variables of interest were performed with the chi-square test within the contingency table procedures.
RESULTS
A significantly (P < 0.001) larger proportion of shelter dogs was clinically healthy. Whereas 63.4% of dogs at the monitored shelter were clinically healthy, 36.6% of dogs showed single or multiple signs of disease. Sex, size, age and purebred vs crossbred categories differed (P < 0.05) in terms of the frequency of clinical signs of disease. A greater prevalence of clinical signs of disease was found in males, in large dogs, in senior dogs (aged
9 years and more) and in purebred dogs. Most diseased dogs (41%) showed multiple clinical signs. Gastrointestinal disease was the most frequent single diagnosis, followed by respiratory diseases, skin diseases and injuries.
CONCLUSIONS
A positive finding is that the population of shelter dogs is healthier than expected. More than 60% of dogs available for adoption over a 10-year period at the monitored shelter had no clinical signs of disease.
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WSVA8-0014
ANIMAL WELFARE
MORTALITY AND EUTHANASIA RATES OF DOGS AT A NO-KILL SHELTER
V. Vecerek1, S. Vitulova1, E. Voslarova1, M. Volfova1
1University of Veterinary and Pharmaceutical Sciences Brno, Department of Animal Protection Welfare and Behaviour, Brno, Czech Republic
INTRODUCTION
Even if dogs admitted to no-kill shelters are not in immediate danger of being killed, those that are not adopted may meet their ultimate fate there eventually.
OBJECTIVES
The aim of this study was to analyze the records on dogs impounded at a Czech municipal shelter in the period from 2007 to 2016.
METHODS
The results were analyzed using the statistical package Unistat 5.6. Statistical comparisons between frequencies of the categorical variables of interest were performed with the chi-square test within the contingency table procedures.
RESULTS
Over 90% of shelter dogs were adopted, whereas death was the ultimate outcome for only 6.4% (2.9% died and 3.5% had to be euthanized for health reasons). Significantly (P < 0.01) more males than females died or were euthanized at the shelter. Different age categories of dogs differed (P < 0.001) in terms of euthanasia and death rates. Unassisted death was most common in dogs younger than six months (44% of all deaths at
the shelter) and was preceded by a short stay at the shelter. The major reasons for the unassisted death
of dogs at the shelter were gastrointestinal diseases (42%), in particular infections. 60% of euthanasia was performed on senior dogs (aged 9 years and more) after prolonged care provided at the shelter. The most common reason for euthanasia in shelter dogs was multisystem organ failure (31%).
CONCLUSIONS
Despite the shelter context being different from that at breeding kennels, our results suggest that mortality and euthanasia rates in shelter dogs can be reasonably low.
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