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WSVA8-0151
FELINE MEDICINE
DETECTION OF LEPTOSPIRAL INFECTION IN SHELTERED CATS IN MALAYSIA.
A. Alashraf1, S.F. Lau1, K.H. Khor1, S.K. Bejo2, A.R. Bahaman2, R. Rozanaliza1
1Universiti Putra Malaysia- Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Veterinary Clinical Studies, Serdang- Selangor, Malaysia
2Universiti Putra Malaysia- Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Veterinary Pathology & Microbiology, Serdang- Selangor, Malaysia
INTRODUCTION
Leptospirosis is one of the most widespread zoonotic diseases in both human and animals. Extensive studies have been conducted to investigate Leptospira in human and different animals’ species, including cats. Although prevalence of leptospiral infection in cats had been reported in many countries, but reliable information about cat’s leptospirosis in Malaysia seems to be insufficient.
Seventy sheltered cats from four shelters were recruited in this study. Upon physical examination,
cats were apparently healthy, but some cats (around 20 cats) showed mild signs of feline upper respiratory disease. Serological test for antibodies detection
by using Microscopic Agglutination Test (MAT) was performed. Sera were tested against 20 pathogenic serovars, namely; Australis, Autumnalis, Canicola, Icterohaemorrhagiae, Grippotyphosa, Pomona, Ballum, Copenhageni, Javanica, Bataviae, Hebdomadis, Hardjobovis, Hardjo-prajitno, Lai, Tarassovi, Pyrogenes, Celledoni, Cynopteri, Djasiman, Malaysia Bejo-Iso9 and one non-pathogenic L. biflexa Patoc 1 strain.
RESULTS
Based on the cut-off point of 1:100, 14.29% of the cats (n=10/70) were tested seropositive to at least one serovar. Only one sera had co-agglutinations to both Javanica (1:400) and Bataviae (1:100). The predominant serovars found were Bataviae (n=4/70), Ballum (n=4/70) and Javanica (n=3/70), with titres ranged between 1:100 to 1:400.
CONCLUSIONS
This result shows that cats might remain clinically healthy despite seropositive against leptospiral infection. More studies are warranted in order to investigate the role of cats in the transmission of the leptospirosis.
Your Singapore, the Tropical Garden City
WSVA8-0082
FELINE MEDICINE
RESULTS OF IN-CLINIC RAPID TESTS FOR FELV ANTIGEN VARY SIGNIFICANTLY
J. Drexel1, J. Liu1, M. Beall2, M. Lappin3, R. Chandrashekar1
1IDEXX Laboratories- Inc., Assay R&D, Westbrook, USA 2IDEXX Laboratories- Inc., Medical affair, Westbrook, USA
3Colorado State University, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Fort Collins, USA
INTRODUCTION
Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) is a highly contagious
virus that can cause life-threatening diseases in cats if infected. In practice, rapid antigen tests are commonly used, and often it is the only mechanism to identify infected cats. The accuracy of rapid tests is of paramount importance.
OBJECTIVES
To compare the performance of three in-clinic rapid tests for FeLV antigen: SNAP® Feline Triple® (IDEXX), Anigen® FIV/FeLV test (BioNote), Speed Duo® FeLV/FIV test (Virbac).
METHODS
Serum or plasma samples were collected from those submitted for feline retroviral testing at IDEXX Reference Laboratories. All samples were screened using an independent laboratory ELISA assay, ViraCHEK®
FeLV (Zoetis), for the presence or absence of FeLV antigen. A total of 84 positive and 101 negative samples were included in this study. Samples were blinded
and randomized for testing with in-clinic rapid tests, according to manufacturers’ instructions.
RESULTS
Compared to ViraCHEK, percent agreements for positive and negative samples were 97.6%/100% (SNAP), 66.7%/97.0% (Anigen), and 51.2%/99.0% (Speed Duo).
CONCLUSIONS
These findings suggest a lower sensitivity for the Anigen and Speed Duo tests, based on the ViraCHEK results Consistent with a recently published study, this study also found a lower specificity for the Anigen test, which would indicate a proportion of the Anigen test positive results could be false positive given very low prevalence for FeLV Both false negative and false positive test results for FeLV could lead to significant clinical issues.
    OBJECTIVES
The aim of this study was to detect the leptospiral infection in sheltered cats in Malaysia and to determine the predominant serovars among cats.
METHODS
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