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WSVA8-0100
FELINE MEDICINE
PREVALENCE OF GASTROINTESTINAL DISEASES IN CATS FROM BOTUCATU CITY, SÃO PAULO STATE, BRAZIL.
A. Melchert1, F. Bueno de Souza1, G. Junqueira dos Santos1, M.L. Gomes Lourenço1, P.T. Chalfun Guimarães Okamoto1, L.H. de Araújo Machado1, S. Canevese Rahal2
1School of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science - Univ Estadual Paulista - Unesp, Veterinary Clinical Departamet, Botucatu, Brazil
2School of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science - Univ Estadual Paulista - Unesp, Departamet of Veterinary Surgery and Anesthesiology, Botucatu, Brazil
INTRODUCTION
Gastrointestinal (GI) diseases involving the alimentary tract and hepatobiliary system are common in cats. Domestic cats present specific anatomical, physiological, nutritional and behavioral characteristics related to the gastrointestinal tract, which may influence the prevalence of diseases of the digestive system. Fundamental efforts to diagnose
GI disorders should always be directed toward localizing disease to a particular segment and determining a cause.
OBJECTIVES
The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of digestive system diseases in domestic cats from Botucatu city, São Paulo (SP) state, Brazil.
METHODS
Were used the medical records of cats with digestive disorders presented at Veterinary Teaching Hospital (FMVZ-UNESP, Botucatu, SP, Brazil) between 2013 to 2016.
RESULTS
The total number of animals evaluated in this period
was 1047 cats. Of these, 259 cats with clinical signs consistent gastrointestinal diseases were included in this study (24.7%). Diagnoses were gastrointestinal parasites (27.8%); hepatic lipidosis (22%); chronic gingivostomatitis (8.9%); acute gastroenteritis (7.7%); acute gastritis (6.2 %); inflamatory bowel disease (3.9 %); dietary indiscretion (3.1 %); Pancreatitis (2.70%); constipation (2.7%); chronic liver disease (1.2%); Megacolon (0.8%); intestinal foreign bodies (0.8%); chronic gastritis (0.8%); Colitis = 2 (0.8%); hepatic neoplasms of unknown etiology (0.8%); feline triad (0.4%); acute hepatitis (toxic) (0.4%); portosystemic shunt (0.4%); Hepatic cysts (0.4%); alimentary lymphoma (0.4%); and intestinal adenocarcinoma (0.4%).
CONCLUSIONS
The most prevalent GI diseases in cats were gastrointestinal parasites and hepatic lipidosis. To the best of author´s knowledge, this is the first survey study on feline digestive disorders in Botucatu city, SP, Brazil.
Your Singapore, the Tropical Garden City
WSVA8-0112
FELINE MEDICINE
PLASMA LIPID PROFILE IN OBESE CATS.
A. Melchert1, F. Bueno de Souza1, M.L. Gomes Lourenço1, P.T. Chalfun Guimarães Okamoto1, D. Velazquez Golino1, N. Volpi Gonçalves1, R. Kiomi Takahira1
1School of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science - Univ Estadual Paulista - UNESP, Veterinary Clinical Departmet, Botucatu, Brazil
INTRODUCTION
Obesity is the most common nutritional disorder in companion animals. It is related to several comorbidities and reduced lifespan. The literature on the effects of obesity on the lipid profile in cats is still limited.
OBJECTIVES
The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the lipid profile in obese and control (lean) cats.
METHODS
Obesity was determined based on the body condition score (BCS), with the nine-point scale. Were evaluated 40 cats, 20 obese (BCS 8-9) and 20 control cats
(BCS 5). Blood was collected after a 12 hour fast, via jugular venipuncture. Serum samples were analysed
for total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), high
density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLc) and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDLc) levels. Automated enzymatic colorimetric methods were used for serum TC, triglyceride and HDLc measurements. LDLc levels were calculated using the formula: LDLc = TC – (HDLc + TG/5) (Friedewald et al., 1972).
RESULTS
In the obese group, 50% and 25% showed an increase in TC and triglycerides, respectively. In the control group, elevations in TC and triglycerides occurred in 50% and 5% of the dogs. There were no statistical differences between the two groups for any of the parameters evaluated. Mean cholesterol, HDLc, LDLc, and triglycerides were: 138.9±37.3, 94.6±16.8, 28.0±28.8 and 117.8±118.8 for obese cats; 132.9±35.0, 93.7±17.4, 25.3±26.8 and 75.7±28.2 for lean cats.
CONCLUSIONS
In obese cats, dyslipidemia was mild but frequent and it should always be evaluated, with emphasis in monitoring of serum cholesterol levels. More studies are needed to evaluate the lipid profile in obese cats.
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