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cultures. If vet nurses are tasked to take samples, it is important to ensure that they are well trained to perform those tasks.
No dermatologic consult is complete without providing the client with a treatment plan. If you fail to plan, you will plan to fail. The owner is the one who has to carry out the treatment plan. Whether is it administering medication or performing an elimination diet trial. It
is hence important that the clients are clear on the treatment and follow up. Provide a clear schedule so that the owner understands what needs to be done and when they need to come back for a follow up. No diet trial will be successful if the owner does not come back for a rechallenge. Arrange for nurses to call clients and remind them of their follow up.
KEY LEARNING OBJECTIVES
· To remember to take a detailed dermatologic history of the patient.
· To be familiar with distribution pattern of different skin diseases.
· To be competent is taking skin samples and to en- sure that nursing staff are also well trained to obtain samples.
· Provide the client with a treatment plan and follow up.
WSV18-0011
FELINE FOCUS (SIMULTANEOUS TRANSLATION INTO MANDARIN CHINESE)
RESPECTFUL CAT HANDLING VS. CAT WRANGLING: FROM THE CAT’S POINT OF VIEW
M. Scherk1
1Dip ABVP (Feline Practice), Vancouver, Canada
PART 1: RESPECTFUL HANDLING: FROM THE CAT’S POINT OF VIEW
In many clinics, some veterinarians and other team members do not enjoy working with cats because they believe that cats are unpredictable and feel anxious about getting hurt. By understanding why cats feel that they need to defend themselves, by learning to identify the warning cues, managing the interactions in a positive manner, and making relatively minor changes to what the cat is exposed to, this fear can be reduced.
The basis for working cooperatively with cats is being empathic to their nature and behaviors and trying to imagine what their experience is like. Cats are a species with a social structure different from ours. We need
to look at cats differently, slow down and adjust our interactions. Minor modifications to the physical facility help reduce the strangeness and threats that cats experience in the veterinary clinic.
The goal of these two presentations is to look at how to change the experience for cats thereby removing some of the obstacles to routine feline veterinary care. This is beneficial for cats and their human companions and will also result in clinic growth.
WHY CATS RESPOND THE WAY THEY DO
In the wild, the number of feral cats living together depends on the availability of resources. These are food, water, privacy and safety, toileting areas, and availability
of sexual partners. Mice and small birds are single portions; they are not large enough to be shared. After weaning, cats are responsible for feeding themselves. The resource density determines the number of cats living in
a given area. In order to reduce conflict and the potential for physical harm associated with fighting, cats have developed an impressive repertoire of signals to maintain distance and protect resources within their territory. This results in little competition and a social structure that does not require sharing or taking turns. Stress is minimal unless resources become scarce. Aggressive communication signals developed in order to keep distance between individuals and to prevent contact with outsiders. Cats need to avoid physical injury in order to be able to hunt and protect themself. When resources are plentiful, a colony will develop consisting of related female cats with their young, who they jointly defend and nurse. Males are relegated to the periphery and vie for breeding privileges; only one mature tom usually lives with the group.
Your Singapore, the Tropical Garden City
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